The Latest

(Sao Paulo, Brazil - March 15, 2014) LAW ESTABLISHING HIP-HOP CULTURE WEEK SIGNED BY GOVERNOR 

It happened on Saturday March 15th at the premises of the Municipal Council, preparatory meeting for the I Municipal Forum of Hip Hop Culture in Boituva organized by core hip-hop NGOs - ACA - Association Citizen of Tomorrow.
The NGO ACA invited to mediate the works Councilman Ronaldo Silva (PHS) author of Law 2.408/2014 establishing the Municipal Culture Week in Hip Hop Boituva, Roger Vianna Director of Culture Boituva, Guilherme Palermo Advisor to the department. Culture Boituva and Márcio Santos, Special Adviser to the State Department Hip Hop Culture. Also participating, Moises Lopez, representative of the Hip-Hop Education Center based in New York, United States.
READ MORE: http://www.ronaldosilva.com.br/hiphop/
Mar 31, 2014 / 1 note
(Sao Paulo, Brazil - March 15, 2014) LAW ESTABLISHING HIP-HOP CULTURE WEEK SIGNED BY GOVERNOR 

It happened on Saturday March 15th at the premises of the Municipal Council, preparatory meeting for the I Municipal Forum of Hip Hop Culture in Boituva organized by core hip-hop NGOs - ACA - Association Citizen of Tomorrow.

The NGO ACA invited to mediate the works Councilman Ronaldo Silva (PHS) author of Law 2.408/2014 establishing the Municipal Culture Week in Hip Hop Boituva, Roger Vianna Director of Culture Boituva, Guilherme Palermo Advisor to the department. Culture Boituva and Márcio Santos, Special Adviser to the State Department Hip Hop Culture. Also participating, Moises Lopez, representative of the Hip-Hop Education Center based in New York, United States.

READ MORE: http://www.ronaldosilva.com.br/hiphop/

jasirix:

Tomorrow I’m rocking Beats and Resistance in Durham, NC!
Mar 31, 2014 / 1 note

jasirix:

Tomorrow I’m rocking Beats and Resistance in Durham, NC!

Mar 25, 2014

Outkasted Conversations #1: Kiese Laymon

To highlight the 20th anniversary of Outkast’s presence in hip hop, Regina N. Bradley will be hosting a series of conversations with scholars, fans, and artists about the significance of Outkast’s music and spirit in how we understand African American popular culture.

Today’s inaugural guest is writer Kiese Laymon, associate professor of English at Vassar College and author of the novel Long Division and the collection of essays How to Slowly Kill Yourself and Others in America.

Professor Questlove schools NYU students in Prince 101
Take it from somebody who knows from experience — students who scribble Prince’s unpronounceable logo on their books are likely to get detention. But there is one class where it might actually earn you extra credit.

The Purple One is now the subject of his own college course for 20 lucky students enrolled at the Clive Davis Institute of Recorded Music at NYU. And one of the teachers dishing out the diamonds and pearls of wisdom in the spring course is Ahmir “Questlove” Thompson of the Roots.
“I’m not expecting people to walk away with their Ph.D. in Purple-ology, but I want to light a spark,” Questlove tells The Post. “It’s a mistake to assume that even in this age of information, people just know about the fundamental records and artists of the ’70s, ’80s, ’90s. What’s the point of being a walking encyclopedia if you don’t share the information?”
The seven-week course (co-taught by…
Read more: http://nypost.com/2014/03/22/professor-questlove-schools-nyu-students-in-prince-101/
Mar 25, 2014 / 6 notes

Professor Questlove schools NYU students in Prince 101

Take it from somebody who knows from experience — students who scribble Prince’s unpronounceable logo on their books are likely to get detention. But there is one class where it might actually earn you extra credit.

The Purple One is now the subject of his own college course for 20 lucky students enrolled at the Clive Davis Institute of Recorded Music at NYU. And one of the teachers dishing out the diamonds and pearls of wisdom in the spring course is Ahmir “Questlove” Thompson of the Roots.

“I’m not expecting people to walk away with their Ph.D. in Purple-ology, but I want to light a spark,” Questlove tells The Post. “It’s a mistake to assume that even in this age of information, people just know about the fundamental records and artists of the ’70s, ’80s, ’90s. What’s the point of being a walking encyclopedia if you don’t share the information?”

The seven-week course (co-taught by…

Read more: http://nypost.com/2014/03/22/professor-questlove-schools-nyu-students-in-prince-101/

Birth of hip hop to be honored with new museum at armory
by Shant Shahrigian 
After months of controversy over efforts to redevelop the Kingsbridge Armory into a massive ice sports arena, one of the key players in the discussions announced a novel use for part of the facility’s large community space last week. Councilman Fernando Cabrera trumpeted a major effort to locate a hip hop museum at the 29 W. Kingsbridge Road site at a spirited City Hall event surrounded by south Bronx pioneers of the genre. “We’re talking about a place where we’re going to have millions of people,” Mr. Cabrera said on the steps of City Hall on March 12. “We will have tourism go up in the Bronx, economic development, jobs that will be created — and to showcase the child that was born in the Bronx… this wonderful culture called hip hop.”After giving a dozen south Bronx natives credited with creating the genre honorary proclamations in City Hall’s Council Chambers, Mr. Cabrera let them do the talking.Some of the artists — from Kevin Donovan, the vocalist and producer known as Afrika Bambaataa, to Theodore Livingston, the DJ known as Grand Wizard Theodore who is credited with making “scratching” a performance technique — enthused about the hip hop museum in rhythmic statements that often bordered on freestyle lyrics.  “We need this hip hop museum to wake up the masses of the people, not just…
Read more: http://riverdalepress.com/stories/Birth-of-hip-hop-to-be-honored-with-new-museum-at-armory,53951?content_source&category_id=5&search_filter&event_mode&event_ts_from&list_type&order_by&order_sort&content_class&sub_type&town_id
Mar 25, 2014 / 5 notes

Birth of hip hop to be honored with new museum at armory

by Shant Shahrigian

After months of controversy over efforts to redevelop the Kingsbridge Armory into a massive ice sports arena, one of the key players in the discussions announced a novel use for part of the facility’s large community space last week. Councilman Fernando Cabrera trumpeted a major effort to locate a hip hop museum at the 29 W. Kingsbridge Road site at a spirited City Hall event surrounded by south Bronx pioneers of the genre.

“We’re talking about a place where we’re going to have millions of people,” Mr. Cabrera said on the steps of City Hall on March 12. “We will have tourism go up in the Bronx, economic development, jobs that will be created — and to showcase the child that was born in the Bronx… this wonderful culture called hip hop.”

After giving a dozen south Bronx natives credited with creating the genre honorary proclamations in City Hall’s Council Chambers, Mr. Cabrera let them do the talking.

Some of the artists — from Kevin Donovan, the vocalist and producer known as Afrika Bambaataa, to Theodore Livingston, the DJ known as Grand Wizard Theodore who is credited with making “scratching” a performance technique — enthused about the hip hop museum in rhythmic statements that often bordered on freestyle lyrics.

“We need this hip hop museum to wake up the masses of the people, not just…

Read more: http://riverdalepress.com/stories/Birth-of-hip-hop-to-be-honored-with-new-museum-at-armory,53951?content_source&category_id=5&search_filter&event_mode&event_ts_from&list_type&order_by&order_sort&content_class&sub_type&town_id

Mar 25, 2014 / 2 notes
Move The Crowd Founder and CEO, Rha Goddess, rocked the TEDxBroadStreet Newark, NJ stage. Watch her share her very personal story of why she was born to move the crowd. She was spurred by hip-hop, her socially-engaged parents, and eventually a desire to heal her relationship (ultimately all of our relationships) to capitalism.
rapcoloringbook:

For Grantland. Very happy and proud that people let me work on this sort of thing. Go read the article please. Thank you. I love you.
Bun B’s Rap Coloring and Activity Book is in stores now. Please go buy one. Thanks. You’re an icon.
Rap Coloring Book on Twitter
Mar 24, 2014 / 479 notes

rapcoloringbook:

For Grantland. Very happy and proud that people let me work on this sort of thing. Go read the article please. Thank you. I love you.

Bun B’s Rap Coloring and Activity Book is in stores now. Please go buy one. Thanks. You’re an icon.

Rap Coloring Book on Twitter

WORD BEATS AND LIFE PRESENTS this Saturday, we are hosting the first step in a scholarship competition through which poets and MC’s can win $5,000 scholarships for college.  This competition is being done in collaboration with Youth Speaks.  In April we are hosting a mural jam (live paint), a city wide youth showcase at MLK library, and our annual Top Notch  2vs 2 b-boy/b-girl jam with a $10,000 prize.  These these events are being hosted in partnership with the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing arts and HiArts as part of the One Mic Festival.
http://www.kennedy-center.org/explorer/artists/?entity_id=107963&source_type=B
Mar 22, 2014 / 1 note

WORD BEATS AND LIFE PRESENTS this Saturday, we are hosting the first step in a scholarship competition through which poets and MC’s can win $5,000 scholarships for college.  This competition is being done in collaboration with Youth Speaks.  In April we are hosting a mural jam (live paint), a city wide youth showcase at MLK library, and our annual Top Notch  2vs 2 b-boy/b-girl jam with a $10,000 prize.  These these events are being hosted in partnership with the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing arts and HiArts as part of the One Mic Festival.

http://www.kennedy-center.org/explorer/artists/?entity_id=107963&source_type=B

Mar 17, 2014 / 2 notes

CALL FOR PAPERS: Critical Approaches to Hip-Hop and Religion Group

Critical Approaches to Hip-Hop and Religion Group

Statement of Purpose: 

This Group’s purpose is to provide a space for interdisciplinary, sustained, scholarly reflection and intellectual advancements at the intersections of religion and hip-hop culture. We believe the Group will assist religious and theological studies to take more seriously hip-hop culture — while expanding the conversation of hip-hop culture beyond a thin analysis of rap music. To these ends, this Group is marked by an effort to offer critical reflection on the multiplicity of the cultural practices of hip-hop culture. We also see something of value in advancing the field of religious studies through attention to how hip-hop might inform these various disciplines and methods. Understood in this way, scholarly attention to hip-hop will not transform it into a passive object of the scholar’s gaze — rather, through our attention to hip-hop, it also speaks back to the work of the AAR, offering tools by which to advance theory and method in the field.

Call for Papers: 

From “Keepin’ It Real to Keepin’ it Right”: Hip-Hop, Representation, and Epistemology

We encourage submissions that explore the generational and geographic impact on hip-hop epistemologies, knowledge formations, and interpretations of such formations. Old school/new school (for one example, see:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0rVup66StNo), East Coast/West Coast (for another, see: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rvL44DxNjp), conscious/gangsta, mainstream/underground, even male/female—are but a few among a wide variety of dichotomous classifications that attempt to order and make sense of hip-hop historiography, products, output, cultural divides, conversion narratives, meaning-making and recurring social ills (e.g., homophobia, misogyny, patriarchy, among other domains). This year, we invite papers that engage various hip-hop epistemologies with attention to their construction through metaphoric and material “shout outs” to space, time, and other taxonomies. What impact do classifications like “East Coast/West Coast” “god/slave” “real/fake” or “sacred/profane” have on the epistemological and hermeneutic parameters and possibilities of what and how hip-hop and religion is studied? How do universalizing, homogenous narratives about “hip-hop” emerge from local, specific cultural products grounded within a specific space and a time? And how are scholars and artists—whether through representing one’s city, country, university, affinity, discipline or methodology—impacted by the weight of time and space shaping what we know about Hip Hop(s) and the academic engagement with it? These are but some of the questions we seek to address as we engage hip-hop epistemologies.

We also seek submissions exploring indigenous hip-hops and the manner in which questions of affinity, appropriation, and/or appreciation become troped and understood in the ensuing cultural battle for/over identity, authenticity, etc. (for a possible cosponsored papers session with the Indigenous Religious Traditions Group).

We also plan to cosponsor a prearranged session with the Religion and Popular Culture Group.

Method: 
PAPERS
Process: 
Proposer names are visible to chairs but anonymous to steering committee members
Leadership: 
Chair Steering Committee
Check out Darryl ‘DMC’ McDaniels’ new comic book
Darryl “DMC” McDaniels always wanted to be the Hulk. Erudite scientist one minute; mighty green behemoth the next.
“What I liked about him was it wasn’t his fault he was the Hulk. He didn’t mean to cause all that trouble. He was such a dominant force, but deep down I pitied him,” McDaniels says.
But he did more than pity him. He copied him.
“If you listen to most of my lyrics — Crash through walls/Cut through floors/Bust through ceilings and knock down doors — everything that I identified with my delivery came from the confidence that was given to me through comic books. … Every time I sat down to write a rhyme, I’d go, ‘What would the Hulk do? What would Spider-Man do? What would the Sub-Mariner do?’ ”
McDaniels went on to be his own dominant force in the music industry as founding member of the multiplatinum-selling Run DMC. Widely considered the most influential rap/hip-hop act of all time, the trio from Queens became the first rap band ever played on MTV, the first to land on the cover of Rolling Stone and the second inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.
Funny how things come full circle.
McDaniels is actually transforming into a superhero — albeit in the pages of his debut comic book “DMC.” He will appear and sign copies of his new project this weekend at Planet Comicon at Bartle Hall.
He says, “Over my 30-year career, I would always
Read more here: http://www.kansascity.com/2014/03/12/4884086/drawn-from-soulful-inspiration.html#storylink=cpy
Read more here: http://www.kansascity.com/2014/03/12/4884086/drawn-from-soulful-inspiration.html#storylink=cpy
Mar 17, 2014 / 3 notes

Check out Darryl ‘DMC’ McDaniels’ new comic book

Darryl “DMC” McDaniels always wanted to be the Hulk. Erudite scientist one minute; mighty green behemoth the next.

“What I liked about him was it wasn’t his fault he was the Hulk. He didn’t mean to cause all that trouble. He was such a dominant force, but deep down I pitied him,” McDaniels says.

But he did more than pity him. He copied him.

“If you listen to most of my lyrics — Crash through walls/Cut through floors/Bust through ceilings and knock down doors — everything that I identified with my delivery came from the confidence that was given to me through comic books. … Every time I sat down to write a rhyme, I’d go, ‘What would the Hulk do? What would Spider-Man do? What would the Sub-Mariner do?’ ”

McDaniels went on to be his own dominant force in the music industry as founding member of the multiplatinum-selling Run DMC. Widely considered the most influential rap/hip-hop act of all time, the trio from Queens became the first rap band ever played on MTV, the first to land on the cover of Rolling Stone and the second inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

Funny how things come full circle.

McDaniels is actually transforming into a superhero — albeit in the pages of his debut comic book “DMC.” He will appear and sign copies of his new project this weekend at Planet Comicon at Bartle Hall.

He says, “Over my 30-year career, I would always


Read more here: http://www.kansascity.com/2014/03/12/4884086/drawn-from-soulful-inspiration.html#storylink=cpy

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

COUNCIL MEMBER CABRERA AND THE NEW YORK CITY COUNCIL 
HONORS AFRIKA BAMBAATAA AND PIONEERS OF HIP HOP CULTURE ON WEDNESDAY, MARCH 12, 2014 @ CITY HALL - 1:00PM

Bronx, NY, March 6, 2014 - Council Member Fernando Cabrera and The New York City Council will formally recognize with a proclamation Afrika Bambaataa, the renowned DJ from the South Bronx, along with other Hip Hop Culture pioneers. The ceremonial presentation of the proclamation will take place during the March 12th Stated meeting at City Hall’s Council Chambers at 1:00 p.m.
A proclamation will be presented individually to: Afrika Bambaataa, Kurtis Blow, Grandmaster Melle Mel, Joe Conzo, Grand Wizard Theodore, Cutman LG, Rocky Bucano, Grandmaster Caz and Jorge Fabel Pabon. 

A special proclamation will also be posthumously given to the legendary Pete DJ Jones who passed away on January 15, 2014. Pete gave many of the pioneers of Hip Hop Culture a platform to showcase their talent.
The proclamation is timely as plans move forward to build the Universal Hip Hop Museum in the Bronx, the place where Hip Hop was born. “It is our hope that, with the historic announcement of the Kingsbridge Armory and the community space that is going to be made available, this location becomes the home of the Universal Hip Hop Museum,” states Rocky Bucano.

Media Relations Universal Hip Hop Museum contact: Rocky Bucano (917) 495-8144 info@uhhm.org
Mar 9, 2014

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

COUNCIL MEMBER CABRERA AND THE NEW YORK CITY COUNCIL 
HONORS AFRIKA BAMBAATAA AND PIONEERS OF HIP HOP CULTURE
ON WEDNESDAY, MARCH 12, 2014 @ CITY HALL - 1:00PM

Bronx, NY, March 6, 2014 - Council Member Fernando Cabrera and The New York City Council will formally recognize with a proclamation Afrika Bambaataa, the renowned DJ from the South Bronx, along with other Hip Hop Culture pioneers. The ceremonial presentation of the proclamation will take place during the March 12th Stated meeting at City Hall’s Council Chambers at 1:00 p.m.
A proclamation will be presented individually to: Afrika Bambaataa, Kurtis Blow, Grandmaster Melle Mel, Joe Conzo, Grand Wizard Theodore, Cutman LG, Rocky Bucano, Grandmaster Caz and Jorge Fabel Pabon. 
A special proclamation will also be posthumously given to the legendary Pete DJ Jones who passed away on January 15, 2014. Pete gave many of the pioneers of Hip Hop Culture a platform to showcase their talent.
The proclamation is timely as plans move forward to build the Universal Hip Hop Museum in the Bronx, the place where Hip Hop was born. “It is our hope that, with the historic announcement of the Kingsbridge Armory and the community space that is going to be made available, this location becomes the home of the Universal Hip Hop Museum,” states Rocky Bucano.
Media Relations Universal Hip Hop Museum contact: Rocky Bucano (917) 495-8144 info@uhhm.org
Mar 9, 2014 / 1 note

jasirix:

"We the Changers" is my favorite song off my album "Ascension", here’s the official video featuring some of my favorite world changers, if you’re feeling the message, please share!

Emdin Discusses How to Reach Students with Hip-Hop 
By Jill Anderson 
At the Askwith Forum, “The Hidden Science of Hip Hop: S.T.E.M. with No Root Bears No Fruit,” Christopher Emdin, associate professor at Teacher’s College, urged educators to look deeper into hip-hop culture as a means to teach and reach students today.
“Our kids are different, not deficient,” he said in his address, a keynote for the 2014 Alumni of Color Conference. Emdin’s research examines how hip-hop culture — particularly its words, phrases, expressions, and language — contains science that often goes unnoticed by educators.
The phenomenon of young adults “dropping science” is less about science than it is about dropping out entirely, Emdin said. In many cases, the students simply aren’t engaged in the classroom and feel that school has nothing to offer. These ideas are often reflected in popular rap songs by artists like Nas and Kanye West. Yet, hip hop also has a long history of references to science, including rappers like Biz Markie and The Mad Scientists referencing it in their music and album art — even the popular term “droppin’ science” means to rap. “What I’m trying to do is get kids to drop back in to science,” Emdin said.
Many popular hip-hop artists, Emdin said, have expressed personal interest in science. For example, Wu Tang Clan’s GZA admitted to wanting to learn science while in school, but he found himself overlooked in the classroom. Once he found fame, he shared his dreams of being an astronaut, going so far as to take science classes on his own. His latest album is entitled, “Dark Matters.” Emdin said interested-but-overlooked students like GZA exist all across the country. At the root of the issue is that educators are not using culture as a means to connect with students.
Read more: http://www.gse.harvard.edu/news-impact/2014/03/emdin-discusses-how-to-reach-students-with-hip-hop/#ixzz2vF1i1nHd
Mar 6, 2014 / 3 notes

Emdin Discusses How to Reach Students with Hip-Hop

By Jill Anderson

At the Askwith Forum, “The Hidden Science of Hip Hop: S.T.E.M. with No Root Bears No Fruit,” Christopher Emdin, associate professor at Teacher’s College, urged educators to look deeper into hip-hop culture as a means to teach and reach students today.

“Our kids are different, not deficient,” he said in his address, a keynote for the 2014 . Emdin’s research examines how hip-hop culture — particularly its words, phrases, expressions, and language — contains science that often goes unnoticed by educators.

The phenomenon of young adults “dropping science” is less about science than it is about dropping out entirely, Emdin said. In many cases, the students simply aren’t engaged in the classroom and feel that school has nothing to offer. These ideas are often reflected in popular rap songs by artists like Nas and Kanye West. Yet, hip hop also has a long history of references to science, including rappers like Biz Markie and The Mad Scientists referencing it in their music and album art — even the popular term “droppin’ science” means to rap. “What I’m trying to do is get kids to drop back in to science,” Emdin said.

Many popular hip-hop artists, Emdin said, have expressed personal interest in science. For example, Wu Tang Clan’s GZA admitted to wanting to learn science while in school, but he found himself overlooked in the classroom. Once he found fame, he shared his dreams of being an astronaut, going so far as to take science classes on his own. His latest album is entitled, “Dark Matters.” Emdin said interested-but-overlooked students like GZA exist all across the country. At the root of the issue is that educators are not using culture as a means to connect with students.

Read more: http://www.gse.harvard.edu/news-impact/2014/03/emdin-discusses-how-to-reach-students-with-hip-hop/#ixzz2vF1i1nHd
 One Mic: Hip-Hop Culture Worldwide March 25 to April 13, 2014
The Kennedy Center, in collaboration with Hi-ARTS, producers of the Hip-Hop Theater Festival, presents One Mic: Hip-Hop Culture Worldwide, a festival celebrating this uniquely American art form. The festival highlights MCing, DJing, b-boying, and graffiti writing, the original four elements of hip-hop culture, alongside contemporary interdisciplinary work born of hip-hop aesthetics. Ticketed and free performances and exhibitions explore the breadth and depth of hip-hop today.
http://www.kennedy-center.org/programs/festivals/13-14/onemic/#
Mar 6, 2014 / 2 notes

One Mic: Hip-Hop Culture Worldwide
March 25 to April 13, 2014

The Kennedy Center, in collaboration with Hi-ARTS, producers of the Hip-Hop Theater Festival, presents One Mic: Hip-Hop Culture Worldwide, a festival celebrating this uniquely American art form. The festival highlights MCing, DJing, b-boying, and graffiti writing, the original four elements of hip-hop culture, alongside contemporary interdisciplinary work born of hip-hop aesthetics. Ticketed and free performances and exhibitions explore the breadth and depth of hip-hop today.

http://www.kennedy-center.org/programs/festivals/13-14/onemic/#

1040 Lounge: Film Screening of Style Wars with Producer Henry ChalfantCelebrating and Promoting the Arts in the BronxFriday, March 21, 6:30pm to 9:00pm
Join us for a screening of the newly-restored Style Wars: The Original Hip Hop Documentary, the filmic record of a golden age of youthful creativity that exploded into the world from a city in crisis. Introduced by producer Henry Chalfant.
Directed by Tony Silver and produced by Tony Silver and Henry Chalfant, Style Wars was awarded the Grand Prize for Documentaries at the 1983 Sundance Film Festival, and is regarded as the indispensable document of New York Street culture of the early ’80s. Style Wars captured the look and feel of New York’s ramshackle subway system as graffiti writers’ public playground, battleground and spectacular artistic canvas. Opposing them by every means possible were Mayor Edward Koch, the police, and the New York Transit Authority. Meanwhile MCs, DJs and B-boys rocked the city with new sounds and new moves and street corner breakdance battles evolved into performance art.  New York’s legendary kings of graffiti and b-boys own a special place in the hip hop pantheon. Style Wars has become an emblem of the original, embracing spirit of hip hop as it reached out across the world from underground tunnels, uptown streets, clubs and playgrounds.  
Free admission and bar (donations suggested)
http://www.bronxmuseum.org/events/1040-lounge-film-screening-of-style-wars
Mar 6, 2014 / 1 note

1040 Lounge: Film Screening of Style Wars with Producer Henry Chalfant
Celebrating and Promoting the Arts in the Bronx
Friday, March 21, 6:30pm to 9:00pm

Join us for a screening of the newly-restored Style Wars: The Original Hip Hop Documentary, the filmic record of a golden age of youthful creativity that exploded into the world from a city in crisis. Introduced by producer Henry Chalfant.

Directed by Tony Silver and produced by Tony Silver and Henry Chalfant, Style Wars was awarded the Grand Prize for Documentaries at the 1983 Sundance Film Festival, and is regarded as the indispensable document of New York Street culture of the early ’80s. Style Wars captured the look and feel of New York’s ramshackle subway system as graffiti writers’ public playground, battleground and spectacular artistic canvas. Opposing them by every means possible were Mayor Edward Koch, the police, and the New York Transit Authority. Meanwhile MCs, DJs and B-boys rocked the city with new sounds and new moves and street corner breakdance battles evolved into performance art.  New York’s legendary kings of graffiti and b-boys own a special place in the hip hop pantheon. Style Wars has become an emblem of the original, embracing spirit of hip hop as it reached out across the world from underground tunnels, uptown streets, clubs and playgrounds.
 

Free admission and bar (donations suggested)

http://www.bronxmuseum.org/events/1040-lounge-film-screening-of-style-wars