9th Wonder class to launch Hip-Hop Institute at NCCU

DURHAM — Patrick Douthit, the Grammy Award-winning hip-hip producer known as 9th Wonder, will teach a class on “Hip-Hop in Context” at N.C. Central University this fall, which will also launch the university’s Hip-Hop Institute.
NCCU formally announced the move at a news conference Monday on campus. NCCU Chancellor Debra Saunders-White said the university is embarking on a new era in its academic offerings. The Hip-Hop Institute is the beginning of an interdisciplinary program, she said, based in the history department.
Jim Harper, chairman of the NCCU history department, said the department is proud to house the Hip-Hop Institute and will also be working with the mass communication and music departments.
“It’s funny how things come full circle,” 9th Wonder said. He, Harper, and NCCU Men’s Basketball Coach LeVelle Moton were all in history class together in the mid-1990s at NCCU. This is also where 9th started his academic journey teaching, he said.
His mother and father were his teachers, but so was hip-hop artist Chuck D. Originally from Winston-Salem, 9th attended NCCU, but didn’t graduate, instead following his hip-hop career. He has worked with a large range of artists, including Mary J. Blige, Jay Z, Murs and Drake. He started the group Little Brother while a student in Durham along with Rapper Big Pooh and Phonte. He came back to NCCU the first time as an adjunct professor from 2006-09, also teaching “Hip-Hop in Context.” He then went on to…
READ MORE: http://www.heraldsun.com/news/localnews/x27233577/9th-Wonder-class-to-launch-Hip-Hop-Institute-at-NCCU

9th Wonder class to launch Hip-Hop Institute at NCCU

NCCU formally announced the move at a news conference Monday on campus. NCCU Chancellor Debra Saunders-White said the university is embarking on a new era in its academic offerings. The Hip-Hop Institute is the beginning of an interdisciplinary program, she said, based in the history department.

Jim Harper, chairman of the NCCU history department, said the department is proud to house the Hip-Hop Institute and will also be working with the mass communication and music departments.

“It’s funny how things come full circle,” 9th Wonder said. He, Harper, and NCCU Men’s Basketball Coach LeVelle Moton were all in history class together in the mid-1990s at NCCU. This is also where 9th started his academic journey teaching, he said.

His mother and father were his teachers, but so was hip-hop artist Chuck D. Originally from Winston-Salem, 9th attended NCCU, but didn’t graduate, instead following his hip-hop career. He has worked with a large range of artists, including Mary J. Blige, Jay Z, Murs and Drake. He started the group Little Brother while a student in Durham along with Rapper Big Pooh and Phonte. He came back to NCCU the first time as an adjunct professor from 2006-09, also teaching “Hip-Hop in Context.” He then went on to…

READ MORE: http://www.heraldsun.com/news/localnews/x27233577/9th-Wonder-class-to-launch-Hip-Hop-Institute-at-NCCU

9th Wonder

THE HIP-HOP FELLOW

The Hip-Hop Fellow is a 78 minute documentary following Grammy Award winning producer 9th Wonder’s tenure at Harvard University as he teaches ‘The Standards of Hip-Hop’ course, conducts research for his thesis and explores hip-hop’s history, culture and role in academia. The film centers on the emerging significance of incorporating hip-hop studies into the academy and spotlights the scholars and musicians at the forefront of preserving 40 years of hip-hop culture.

Interviewees include Dr. Henry Louis Gates, Kendrick Lamar, Young Guru, Dr. Mark Anthony Neal, Phonte, Dr. Marcyliena Morgan, Ali Shaheed Muhammad, Ab-Soul, Rapper Big Pooh & DJ Premier.

FOR MORE INFORMATION VISIT: thehiphopfellow.com
FOLLOW US twitter.com/thehiphopfellow

pricefilms.com

9th wonder kenneth price hip-hop archives

9th WONDER & THE HIP-HOP ACADEMY 
Over the past 15-20 years, one of the fastest growing sections in academic discourse is that which hones in on hip-hop as an art form and global cultural force. While various intellectuals have been at the forefront of this movement, few can offer the unique perspective provided by a someone who’s been in the trenches themselves. Enter Grammy-winning producer 9th Wonder, who emerged 10 years ago with Little Brother and has since racked up credits for everyone from to Destiny’s Child toErykah Badu to JAY Z. In addition to producer, DJ, A&R and label executive, the North Carolina native also wears another hat: professor. Beginning teaching at North Carolina Central University in 2007, his talents have taken him to Duke and Harvard University, as well, schooling the next generation on the the origin and social importance of hip-hop, its samples and more.
Life+Times caught up with 9th to get his take on hip-hop’s importance in the academy, his experience teaching and more.
Life+Times: Talk about the importance of hip-hop courses in the academy, especially the way you’ve talked about hip-hop before as being misrepresented and misconstrued in the mainstream.9th Wonder: Well I think that now, we’re at that at that age. Hip-hop is at that age where – they thought that hip-hop wasn’t gonna be around that long, even in the early years and the early ’80s, they thought it was just a fad – it’s used in commercials, it’s used to advertise, it’s used in so many ways, it’s so much a facet of our society now, whether you understand the art form, whether you like it, whatever, if you hear somebody say young people’s music, the next thing they’re gonna say is hip-hop. But they fail to realize that this year is like the 40th year of hip-hop’s existence, so, we’re at that point where it needs to be studied. This is a multi-million dollar business around the globe, you know, so it’s at that point where we have to [teach about it] because now, the generation gap is so wide, and now teachers believe that this is a way that we can communicate with our kids. They put on CNN recently that Nas was the greatest lyricist of all time – not the greatest artist, just the greatest lyricist – and for CNN, a main media network, to say that speaks volumes because now people even in the media ranks are trying to see hip-hop from a more educational and artistic standpoint. See, he wasn’t the greatest selling artist of all-time, but if we’re talking about lyricists – and hip-hop is built so much on lyrics – they picked Nas. So it’s really at that point now because they’re seeing it, like, “Yo, this is an art form that we have to really recognize and we can’t ignore it anymore.” And once they start to do it, you know that it’s really gonna turn into something, now it’s really gonna turn into a study.
Read More: http://lifeandtimes.com/9th-wonder-the-hip-hop-academy

9th WONDER & THE HIP-HOP ACADEMY 

Over the past 15-20 years, one of the fastest growing sections in academic discourse is that which hones in on hip-hop as an art form and global cultural force. While various intellectuals have been at the forefront of this movement, few can offer the unique perspective provided by a someone who’s been in the trenches themselves. Enter Grammy-winning producer 9th Wonder, who emerged 10 years ago with Little Brother and has since racked up credits for everyone from to Destiny’s Child toErykah Badu to JAY Z. In addition to producer, DJ, A&R and label executive, the North Carolina native also wears another hat: professor. Beginning teaching at North Carolina Central University in 2007, his talents have taken him to Duke and Harvard University, as well, schooling the next generation on the the origin and social importance of hip-hop, its samples and more.

Life+Times caught up with 9th to get his take on hip-hop’s importance in the academy, his experience teaching and more.

Life+Times: Talk about the importance of hip-hop courses in the academy, especially the way you’ve talked about hip-hop before as being misrepresented and misconstrued in the mainstream.
9th Wonder
: Well I think that now, we’re at that at that age. Hip-hop is at that age where – they thought that hip-hop wasn’t gonna be around that long, even in the early years and the early ’80s, they thought it was just a fad – it’s used in commercials, it’s used to advertise, it’s used in so many ways, it’s so much a facet of our society now, whether you understand the art form, whether you like it, whatever, if you hear somebody say young people’s music, the next thing they’re gonna say is hip-hop. But they fail to realize that this year is like the 40th year of hip-hop’s existence, so, we’re at that point where it needs to be studied. This is a multi-million dollar business around the globe, you know, so it’s at that point where we have to [teach about it] because now, the generation gap is so wide, and now teachers believe that this is a way that we can communicate with our kids. They put on CNN recently that Nas was the greatest lyricist of all time – not the greatest artist, just the greatest lyricist – and for CNN, a main media network, to say that speaks volumes because now people even in the media ranks are trying to see hip-hop from a more educational and artistic standpoint. See, he wasn’t the greatest selling artist of all-time, but if we’re talking about lyricists – and hip-hop is built so much on lyrics – they picked Nas. So it’s really at that point now because they’re seeing it, like, “Yo, this is an art form that we have to really recognize and we can’t ignore it anymore.” And once they start to do it, you know that it’s really gonna turn into something, now it’s really gonna turn into a study.

Read More: http://lifeandtimes.com/9th-wonder-the-hip-hop-academy

9TH WONDER

SUPPORT THE HARVARD FELLOW DOCUMENTARY BY KENNETH PRICE, FEATURING 9TH WONDER

The Harvard Fellow follows one of hiphop’s most dynamic artists, 9th Wonder through a year of lecturing and research at Harvard University. While at Harvard, 9th will have an office on campus, teach a class on the history of hiphop, complete a research project and further explore hiphop’s history and culture in an academic setting.

http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/40010854/the-harvard-fellow-documentary

9th wonder kenneth price