Taking A Page From Nas, Rakim Makes An Unauthorized Biography Of Nelson Mandela (Audio)
by Ambrosia For Heads 
Almost a decade after Nas made “U.B.R.” (the unauthorized biography of Rakim), Rakim raps the life of the late South African President Nelson Mandela. The song is called “Madiba,” (Mandela’s nickname, in part, meaning “father”) and is said to appear on the upcoming film soundtrack, Mandela: The Long Walk To Freedom, starring Idris Elba. The song is released just weeks after President Mandela’s death. Heads know that Rakim verses are extremely rare these days, suggesting just how moved he was by the storied emancipator, and pillar of kindness, patience, and determination.

Taking A Page From Nas, Rakim Makes An Unauthorized Biography Of Nelson Mandela (Audio)

by Ambrosia For Heads 

Almost a decade after Nas made “U.B.R.” (the unauthorized biography of Rakim), Rakim raps the life of the late South African President Nelson Mandela. The song is called “Madiba,” (Mandela’s nickname, in part, meaning “father”) and is said to appear on the upcoming film soundtrack, Mandela: The Long Walk To Freedom, starring Idris Elba. The song is released just weeks after President Mandela’s death. Heads know that Rakim verses are extremely rare these days, suggesting just how moved he was by the storied emancipator, and pillar of kindness, patience, and determination.

rakim mandela hiphoped hiphopeducation

BEYONCE’S Album Sparks Black Feminism Debate

Beyonce’s self-titled album has been making headlines since its release late last week. week. But while many praise it, others have gotten into a heated debate about just how feminist— or anti-feminist— the album really is.

Hosted by: Marc Lamont Hill

Guests: Joan Morgan @milfinainteasy (New York, NY) Journalist, Author and Cultural Critic

Kaila Story @doctressstory (Louisville , KY) Associate Professor at the University of Louisville

Imani Uzuri @gypsygirlbliss (New York, NY) Vocalist, Composer & Cultural Worker

Rahiel Tesfamariam @RahielT (New York, NY) Columnist at the Washington Post; Founder of UrbanCusp.com

Rosa Clemente @rosaclemente (Amherst, MA) Activist & Journalist; 2008 Green Party Vice Presidential Candidate

Treva Lindsey @divafeminist (Columbus, OH) Assistant Professor of Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at Ohio State University.

Marc Lamont Hill Rosa Clemente Joan Morgan Treva Lindsey Imani Uzuri Rahiel Tesfamariam Kaila Story hiphopeducation

HIP HOP REMIXES SCIENCE

You’re invited inside Bronx Compass High School to witness the first day of Science Genius, a revolutionary pilot program which uses hip hop culture to teach science.

Guided by hip hop educator Dr. Chris Emdin and his team, these ninth grader write raps based on their current science lesson. Will the marriage between hip hop and science be a success? Find out!

PRODIGIES is a bi-weekly series showcasing the youngest and brightest as they challenge themselves to reach new heights and the stories behind them.

Created and produced by @radical.media, THNKR gives you extraordinary access to the people, stories, places and thinking that will change your mind.

chris emdin hiphoped hiphopeducation

UTFO’S KANGOL KID HELPS STUDENTS FINISH THEIR G.E.D. IN 2013

In one of Hip-Hop’s greatest songs (“Roxanne, Roxanne”) UTFO’s lead member Kangol Kid is recorded saying, “I can sing, rap and dance in just one show.” Well, today he can add “teach, lecture and act in just one blow”. Last month, New York City’s General Equivalency Diploma (GED) officials recruited Shaun Fequiere (professionally known as “Kangol Kid”) as a spokesperson for their “Finish Your GED In 2013” campaign to encourage enrolled students to acquire their diploma before this year ends. Apparently, all NYC GED test scores accumulated by students this year will NOT transfer to the following year and will be lost. Therefore, this citywide campaign will begin immediately with two locally televised PSA commercials featuring Kangol and will end on December 31, 2013.

In the mid 80’s Kangol Kid was the front man for the legendary rap group “UTFO” and was undisputedly one of Hip-Hop’s first poster pin-up sex symbols. His signature trademark hat and marketability enabled him to become Hip-Hop’s first ever product endorsed rap star. He snagged his groundbreaking deal with Kangol Headwear, USA before RunDMC & Adidas and MC Hammer & KFC. “At first the Kangol Hat Company threatened to sue me for using their name unlawfully until they realized the sales of their brand increased in every city that I performed in… surely it was time to make a deal”, said Kang.

BRIC’s (Brooklyn Information & Culture) Director/Writer Johnathan Lief and his team filmed this PSA/commercial confident that lightening will strike again with Kangol Kid’s presence. Instead of increasing the number of hat sales, the goal is to increase the number of student graduates this year. “Kangol’s many accomplishments and stainless creditability makes him the perfect mentor and role model for our youth”, said Lief. BRIC’s Senior Producer Kuye Youngblood adds

Read More: http://www.brandnewz.com/?p=14748

UTFO kangol BRANDNEWZ hiphopeducation

ArtistWorks, DJ Times and Thudrumble Present “Skratch Theory Live”Skratch and turntablism pioneer to perform, teach and discuss the history of the craft.
WHAT:DJ Times, the USA’s 1st and industry-leading magazine for DJs and producers, in conjunction with ArtistWorks and Thud Rumble, is proud to present a free online workshop featuring 2010America’s Best DJ winner DJ Qbert.
Viewers will be treated to a workshop on “Skratch Theory,” featuring DJ Qbert teaching some of the principles that are fundamental to Qbert Skratch University, DJ Qbert’s online Skratch School. There will be live skratching from Qbert and special guests, as well as a discussion with Qbert and Yogafrog on the history of turntablism and their involvement in the booming Bay Area DJ scene.
Justin Bua, visual artist and creator of “The DJ,” and other iconic urban paintings, will join the discussion as a special guest.
WHEN:The workshop will take place online on Thursday, April 25th, 2013, at 9:00 p.m. EST, and will be moderated by Thud Rumble co-founder Yogafrog.
WHERE:“Skratch Theory Live” will stream live viaDJTimes.com.Sign up for our DJ Insider email newsletter to get an email reminder, or alternatively, connect with us on Facebook or Twitter, where we will send out the live-stream link the day of the event.The live-stream will also be available for viewing onArtistWorks’ Google+ page and atQbertSkratchUniversity.com.

ArtistWorks, DJ Times and Thudrumble Present “Skratch Theory Live”
Skratch and turntablism pioneer to perform, teach and discuss the history of the craft.

WHAT:
DJ Times, the USA’s 1st and industry-leading magazine for DJs and producers, in conjunction with ArtistWorks and Thud Rumble, is proud to present a free online workshop featuring 2010America’s Best DJ winner DJ Qbert.

Viewers will be treated to a workshop on “Skratch Theory,” featuring DJ Qbert teaching some of the principles that are fundamental to Qbert Skratch University, DJ Qbert’s online Skratch School. There will be live skratching from Qbert and special guests, as well as a discussion with Qbert and Yogafrog on the history of turntablism and their involvement in the booming Bay Area DJ scene.

Justin Bua, visual artist and creator of “The DJ,” and other iconic urban paintings, will join the discussion as a special guest.

WHEN:
The workshop will take place online on Thursday, April 25th, 2013, at 9:00 p.m. EST, and will be moderated by Thud Rumble co-founder Yogafrog.

WHERE:
“Skratch Theory Live” will stream live viaDJTimes.com.

Sign up for our DJ Insider email newsletter to get an email reminder, or alternatively, connect with us on Facebook or Twitter, where we will send out the live-stream link the day of the event.

The live-stream will also be available for viewing onArtistWorks’ Google+ page and atQbertSkratchUniversity.com.

dj qbert dj times hiphopeducation hiphoped

PAC’S KIDS LEADERSHIP & ARTS SUMMER CAMP
Registration is now open for the Tupac Amaru Shakur Foundation’s Leadership & Arts Summer Camp. Applications must be received by May 18. Spaces are limited. Applications are considered on a first-come, first-serve basis. Since 1999, the PAC’s Kids Leadership & Arts Summer Camp has provided training and support for youth who aspire to enhance their creative talents. During camp, participants build on a variety of creative abilities through classes in Creative Writing, Acting, Dance, Vocal Training, Set and Stage Design, Visual Arts, and the Recording Arts. The skills acquired during the Camp culminate with a Closing Ceremony Production where camp participants showcase their learning experience to parents and friends.
Camp dates for ages 7-11 July 8-July 26, 2013, M-F, Doors open at 7:30am, Camp Hours 8:30am-4pm, Pick up 4pm-5pm Pac’s Kids Recital-July 27, 2013 Tuition: $215 fee for a new student: $175 fee for a returning student; multi-student discount is $50 off for each additional student. Tuition is a one-time fee and is due once the student has been interviewed and accepted into the camp. Parents will be notified of their child’s acceptance into the camp or placement on the waiting list. Tuition assistance is available. Phone interviews will be conducted separately for students that attend school outside of Georgia.
DOWNLOAD YOUR SUMMER CAMP APPLICATION http://www.tasf.org/programs/leadership-arts/

PAC’S KIDS LEADERSHIP & ARTS SUMMER CAMP

Registration is now open for the Tupac Amaru Shakur Foundation’s Leadership & Arts Summer Camp. Applications must be received by May 18. Spaces are limited. Applications are considered on a first-come, first-serve basis. Since 1999, the PAC’s Kids Leadership & Arts Summer Camp has provided training and support for youth who aspire to enhance their creative talents. During camp, participants build on a variety of creative abilities through classes in Creative Writing, Acting, Dance, Vocal Training, Set and Stage Design, Visual Arts, and the Recording Arts. The skills acquired during the Camp culminate with a Closing Ceremony Production where camp participants showcase their learning experience to parents and friends.

Camp dates for ages 7-11 July 8-July 26, 2013, M-F, Doors open at 7:30am, Camp Hours 8:30am-4pm, Pick up 4pm-5pm Pac’s Kids Recital-July 27, 2013 Tuition: $215 fee for a new student: $175 fee for a returning student; multi-student discount is $50 off for each additional student. Tuition is a one-time fee and is due once the student has been interviewed and accepted into the camp. Parents will be notified of their child’s acceptance into the camp or placement on the waiting list. Tuition assistance is available. Phone interviews will be conducted separately for students that attend school outside of Georgia.

DOWNLOAD YOUR SUMMER CAMP APPLICATION http://www.tasf.org/programs/leadership-arts/

hiphoped hiphopeducation Tupac Amaru Shakur

  
WORDS BEATS & LIFE: THE GLOBAL JOURNAL OF HIP-HOP 


Call for Submissions
Seeking submissions for three themes that will be presented at the 2013 Teach-In:
Hip Hop as an identity,
Hip Hop and capacity building, and
Legacy: Lessons learned from our elders and ancestors
Hip Hop as an Identity
What does it mean to say, “I am Hip Hop”? Knowledge of Self is considered the fifth element of Hip Hop, yet Hip Hop is rarely publicly discussed as an identity.  By identity we are referring to that which contributes to an individual’s character, personal understanding, and worldview.  We are currently accepting academic papers, poems, essays, and visual arts that speak to Hip Hop as an identity.
Hip Hop and Capacity Building 
What began as a way to “keep kids off the street” is evolving from a movement into a unified and cohesive field.  WBL is looking for examples of promising practices in Education (K – 16), Nonprofit, For-Profit, and the emerging For-mission space to include in a wide-reaching, information exchange. This will not only help other programs do a better job of connecting with youth, but also help develop standards of practice that will contribute to the advancement of the field.  We are specifically interested in models of program design or case studies on leadership, grassroots advocacy, holistic approaches to education, and policies that support sustainability.
Legacy: Lessons Learned from our Elders and Ancestors
History provides numerous examples of art transforming communities in meaningful and tangible ways. So any effort to advance the field would be incomplete without taking a moment to look back and apply prior experience to new circumstances.  WBL is looking for submissions that will allow us to learn from the wisdom of our elders and ancestors. 
Please submit a 150-word abstract for your submission with an email address and telephone number by March 30, 2013. Panel proposals will be considered as well as short films, poetry, and artwork. The authors of those submissions that are selected for publication will be invited to present at the 2013 Teach In scheduled for July 12-14, 2013.Submissions can take the form of the following:  Scholarly research papers, critical essays, scholarly reviews, editorials, prose, poetry and artworkFor more details including word count, and process of submitting see the full call for submissions HERE

WORDS BEATS & LIFE: THE GLOBAL JOURNAL OF HIP-HOP 

Call for Submissions

Seeking submissions for three themes that will be presented at the 2013 Teach-In:

  1. Hip Hop as an identity,
  2. Hip Hop and capacity building, and
  3. Legacy: Lessons learned from our elders and ancestors

Hip Hop as an Identity

What does it mean to say, “I am Hip Hop”? Knowledge of Self is considered the fifth element of Hip Hop, yet Hip Hop is rarely publicly discussed as an identity.  By identity we are referring to that which contributes to an individual’s character, personal understanding, and worldview.  We are currently accepting academic papers, poems, essays, and visual arts that speak to Hip Hop as an identity.

Hip Hop and Capacity Building 

What began as a way to “keep kids off the street” is evolving from a movement into a unified and cohesive field.  WBL is looking for examples of promising practices in Education (K – 16), Nonprofit, For-Profit, and the emerging For-mission space to include in a wide-reaching, information exchange. This will not only help other programs do a better job of connecting with youth, but also help develop standards of practice that will contribute to the advancement of the field.  We are specifically interested in models of program design or case studies on leadership, grassroots advocacy, holistic approaches to education, and policies that support sustainability.

Legacy: Lessons Learned from our Elders and Ancestors

History provides numerous examples of art transforming communities in meaningful and tangible ways. So any effort to advance the field would be incomplete without taking a moment to look back and apply prior experience to new circumstances.  WBL is looking for submissions that will allow us to learn from the wisdom of our elders and ancestors. 


Please submit a 150-word abstract for your submission with an email address and telephone number by March 30, 2013. Panel proposals will be considered as well as short films, poetry, and artwork. The authors of those submissions that are selected for publication will be invited to present at the 2013 Teach In scheduled for July 12-14, 2013.

Submissions can take the form of the following:  Scholarly research papers, critical essays, scholarly reviews, editorials, prose, poetry and artwork

For more details including word count, and process of submitting see the full call for submissions HERE

words beats and Life hiphopeducation

Marley Marl ‘Classic Recipes’ - Recreating MC Shan ‘The Bridge’ w/ Akai MPC Renaissance

In this episode of Classic Recipes, the legendary producer Marley Marl explains and demonstrates how he created the beat for MC Shan’s “The Bridge,” one of the most memorable beats in hip hop history. As always, along with the beat programming tips and composition/production techniques he also gives us the lowdown on where and when the music was originally created.

Marl recalls the moment he first met MC Shan and recorded “Marley Marl Scratch,” and also remembers when legendary rap radio personality Mr. Magic rejected a Boogie Down Productions record that was submitted for airplay on WBLS-FM, later resulting in the feud between the South Bronx crew and Marl’s Juice Crew.

"The Bridge" was originally created using the Roland TR-808 Rhythm Composer and the Korg SDD-2000 Sampling Digital Delay. Marley Marl programmed the beat by triggering drum sounds (the kick and snare) from the TR-808 into the SDD-2000, giving the track a unique sound and feel.

In this video he recreates the beat using the Akai MPC Renaissance; instead of just sampling The Honey Drippers’ track “Impeach The President” intro drum beat, Marley completely reprogrammed the beat from the kick and snare right down to the “Ladies and gentlemen” voice intro. Along with adding some ghost notes, he reversed The Magic Disco Machine’s “Scratching’” record to create the stabs and gritty noises you hear at the beginning of “The Bridge.” (Check out the last episode of Classic Recipes for more on ghost notes and how Marl used them in Eric B. & Rakim’s “Eric B. Is President.” http://bit.ly/Toe3tt)

Marley Marl mc Shan dubspot hiphopeducation hiphoped

  RAP MUSIC & THE EMPOWERMENT OF TODAY’S YOUTH: EVIDENCE IN EVERYDAY MUSIC LISTENING, MUSIC THERAPY, AND COMMERCIAL RAP MUSIC
Raphael Travis Jr.
Child & Adolescent Social Work Journal
Pioneers of various elements of Hip-Hop culture have been empowered through the ability to voice their reality and find a meaningful identity alongside others who found purpose and function in embracing Hip-Hop culture (Chang, Can’t stop won’t stop: A history of the hip-hop generation, 2005). This empowerment persists in various reinventions of the culture within the United States and worldwide. The present study examines whether evidence exists in research to support the value of esteem, resilience, growth, community and change as empowering dimensions outlined in the individual and community empowerment framework. Research questions ask: (1) Does youth self-expression in rap music created within music therapy sessions reflect framework dimensions? (2) Does content in commercially recognizable rap music reflect framework dimensions? (3) How well does the framework align with a model of empowerment-based positive youth development? First, data collected to examine the validity of the framework were reviewed. Next, two peer-reviewed research studies published after articulation of the original framework, were examined to investigate commonality between themes and framework dimensions. One study was in a music therapy context and another explored themes in commercial Hip-Hop recordings. Original framework data supports theorizing that rap music content actually comprisesdevelopmental narratives (Travis and Deepak, 2011; Travis and Bowman, 2012). Data in the present study further suggest that these developmental narratives are relevant for Hip-Hop in every day music engagement, in therapeutic self-expression, and within commercially available musical content. Framework dimensions also aligned with a conceptual model of positive youth development that allows specification of intervention pathways and empirically testable outcomes for Hip-Hop integrated change strategies. Results suggest that rap music is a discourse in lifespan development. Rap music’s developmental narratives may be used by practitioners, parents and researchers. The narratives exist within a framework and model that (a) provides a template for better understanding these narratives and (b) positions this understanding for use as a tool to promote and research positive change strategies for individuals and the communities that they value.
http://www.springerlink.com/content/4078132358174355/

RAP MUSIC & THE EMPOWERMENT OF TODAY’S YOUTH: EVIDENCE IN EVERYDAY MUSIC LISTENING, MUSIC THERAPY, AND COMMERCIAL RAP MUSIC

Raphael Travis Jr.

Child & Adolescent Social Work Journal

Pioneers of various elements of Hip-Hop culture have been empowered through the ability to voice their reality and find a meaningful identity alongside others who found purpose and function in embracing Hip-Hop culture (Chang, Can’t stop won’t stop: A history of the hip-hop generation, 2005). This empowerment persists in various reinventions of the culture within the United States and worldwide. The present study examines whether evidence exists in research to support the value of esteem, resilience, growth, community and change as empowering dimensions outlined in the individual and community empowerment framework. Research questions ask: (1) Does youth self-expression in rap music created within music therapy sessions reflect framework dimensions? (2) Does content in commercially recognizable rap music reflect framework dimensions? (3) How well does the framework align with a model of empowerment-based positive youth development? First, data collected to examine the validity of the framework were reviewed. Next, two peer-reviewed research studies published after articulation of the original framework, were examined to investigate commonality between themes and framework dimensions. One study was in a music therapy context and another explored themes in commercial Hip-Hop recordings. Original framework data supports theorizing that rap music content actually comprisesdevelopmental narratives (Travis and Deepak, 2011; Travis and Bowman, 2012). Data in the present study further suggest that these developmental narratives are relevant for Hip-Hop in every day music engagement, in therapeutic self-expression, and within commercially available musical content. Framework dimensions also aligned with a conceptual model of positive youth development that allows specification of intervention pathways and empirically testable outcomes for Hip-Hop integrated change strategies. Results suggest that rap music is a discourse in lifespan development. Rap music’s developmental narratives may be used by practitioners, parents and researchers. The narratives exist within a framework and model that (a) provides a template for better understanding these narratives and (b) positions this understanding for use as a tool to promote and research positive change strategies for individuals and the communities that they value.

http://www.springerlink.com/content/4078132358174355/

child and adolescent social work journal Raphael Travis Jr. hiphopeducation hiphoped