The Hip-Hop Underground and African American Culture

Beneath the Surface

The underground is a multi-faceted concept in African American culture. Peterson explores a variety of “underground” concepts at the intersections of African American literature and hip-hop culture, using Richard Wright, KRS-One, Thelonious Monk, and the tradition of the Underground Railroad, among other examples. He explores the manifestations and the attributes of the underground within the context of a more panoramic picture of African American expressivity, situated at black cultural and conceptual crossroads.
http://www.palgrave.com/page/detail/the-hiphop-underground-and-african-american-culture-james-braxton-peterson/?K=9781137305244

The Hip-Hop Underground and African American Culture

Beneath the Surface

The underground is a multi-faceted concept in African American culture. Peterson explores a variety of “underground” concepts at the intersections of African American literature and hip-hop culture, using Richard Wright, KRS-One, Thelonious Monk, and the tradition of the Underground Railroad, among other examples. He explores the manifestations and the attributes of the underground within the context of a more panoramic picture of African American expressivity, situated at black cultural and conceptual crossroads.

http://www.palgrave.com/page/detail/the-hiphop-underground-and-african-american-culture-james-braxton-peterson/?K=9781137305244

James Peterson

Join Tony Award nominee Kenny Leon, Saul Williams, producer Jessica Green, and Marcyliena Morgan, executive director of Harvard’s HipHop Archive, for an in-depth discussion about this groundbreaking production.  Dr. James Peterson, director of Africana Studies and Associate Professor at Lehigh University, will moderate.
The music of Tupac Shakur blazes to life on Broadway in the new musical Holler If Ya Hear Me . It is at once a love story and an un-retouched picture of life in the streets. The cast of 22 includes Saul Williams, Christopher Jackson, Saycon Sengbloh, Ben Thompson, John Earl Jelks, Joshua Boone, Dyllon Burnside and Tony Award winner Tonya Pinkins.

Monday, May 12 at 6:30 p.m.
 RSVP: http://www.eventbrite.com/e/theatre-talks-holler-if-ya-hear-me-tickets-11483111295?utm_source=eNewsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_content=Schomburgconnection20140506&utm_campaign=Schomburg

Join Tony Award nominee Kenny Leon, Saul Williams, producer Jessica Green, and Marcyliena Morgan, executive director of Harvard’s HipHop Archive, for an in-depth discussion about this groundbreaking production.  Dr. James Peterson, director of Africana Studies and Associate Professor at Lehigh University, will moderate.

The music of Tupac Shakur blazes to life on Broadway in the new musical Holler If Ya Hear Me . It is at once a love story and an un-retouched picture of life in the streets. The cast of 22 includes Saul Williams, Christopher Jackson, Saycon Sengbloh, Ben Thompson, John Earl Jelks, Joshua Boone, Dyllon Burnside and Tony Award winner Tonya Pinkins.

Monday, May 12 at 6:30 p.m.

RSVP: http://www.eventbrite.com/e/theatre-talks-holler-if-ya-hear-me-tickets-11483111295?utm_source=eNewsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_content=Schomburgconnection20140506&utm_campaign=Schomburg

james peterson saul williams kenny leon jessica green marcyleina morgan

Photo by Eric Arnold

A GAME-CHANGER IN THE MOVE TOWARD EMPOWERING BAY AREA YOUTH

Mentor on a mission
It’s Thursday afternoon and a handful of students are still lingering in John O’Connell’s atrium, a rather unusual sight given the beautiful springtime weather. While most students sprint toward the exit doors before the last bell rings, these few students surround Banjoko, who they affectionately call “OG ‘Dis”, with energetic conversation, switching topics from the Warriors’ upcoming playoff series to the top 10 martial arts references in hip hop. From a distance, Banjoko could pass for a young teacher, or perhaps a graduate student, in his Harvard t-shirt, matching Harvard baseball cap, black-framed glasses, and loose-fitting jeans. When asked if he was ever mistaken for a student, Banjoko laughs, then leans forward with a look of seriousness.
“Actually, I’m wearing Harvard gear because I just spoke there,” says Banjoko, referencing his recent presentation at the Alumni of Color Conference at the university’s Graduate School of Education.
“The reality is that I didn’t even graduate from high school. I wanted out, so I got a GED.”
It may come as a surprise, then, that Banjoko – born in San Francisco and raised in San Bruno – would return to the roots he once tried to escape, employed as part of John O’Connell’s well-loved security staff, as well as operating a non-profit focused on educating youth. In fact, one of the main goals of Banjoko’s organization is encouraging kids to reach college.
“I created Hip Hop Chess Federation so that me, and other mentors who are committed to the cause [of helping at risk students], could be the people that I needed in high school,” Banjoko says, reflecting on his upbringing and need for guidance.
Though Banjoko credits his parents for supporting him, he dealt with bullying, violence, and racial problems from elementary through high school.
“Being in San Bruno wasn’t necessarily a picnic for us, as we were one of the few black families in an upper middle class area. It was very clear we weren’t welcome.”
Banjoko sought solace in hip hop music as a youth; it functioned as an outlet and sanctuary. Not only did the lyrics lend meaning to a racially-charged time, but he noticed a reoccurring mention of chess in these rappers’ lyrics, which drew him into the game as a form of meditation, along with martial arts. Seeing the self-healing trifecta, Banjoko now uses these tools as a basis for guiding students’ on a path toward self-discovery.
READ MORE: http://www.examiner.com/article/a-game-changer-the-move-toward-empowering-bay-area-youth?cid=rss

Photo by Eric Arnold

A GAME-CHANGER IN THE MOVE TOWARD EMPOWERING BAY AREA YOUTH

Mentor on a mission

It’s Thursday afternoon and a handful of students are still lingering in John O’Connell’s atrium, a rather unusual sight given the beautiful springtime weather. While most students sprint toward the exit doors before the last bell rings, these few students surround Banjoko, who they affectionately call “OG ‘Dis”, with energetic conversation, switching topics from the Warriors’ upcoming playoff series to the top 10 martial arts references in hip hop. From a distance, Banjoko could pass for a young teacher, or perhaps a graduate student, in his Harvard t-shirt, matching Harvard baseball cap, black-framed glasses, and loose-fitting jeans. When asked if he was ever mistaken for a student, Banjoko laughs, then leans forward with a look of seriousness.

“Actually, I’m wearing Harvard gear because I just spoke there,” says Banjoko, referencing his recent presentation at the Alumni of Color Conference at the university’s Graduate School of Education.

“The reality is that I didn’t even graduate from high school. I wanted out, so I got a GED.”

It may come as a surprise, then, that Banjoko – born in San Francisco and raised in San Bruno – would return to the roots he once tried to escape, employed as part of John O’Connell’s well-loved security staff, as well as operating a non-profit focused on educating youth. In fact, one of the main goals of Banjoko’s organization is encouraging kids to reach college.

“I created Hip Hop Chess Federation so that me, and other mentors who are committed to the cause [of helping at risk students], could be the people that I needed in high school,” Banjoko says, reflecting on his upbringing and need for guidance.

Though Banjoko credits his parents for supporting him, he dealt with bullying, violence, and racial problems from elementary through high school.

“Being in San Bruno wasn’t necessarily a picnic for us, as we were one of the few black families in an upper middle class area. It was very clear we weren’t welcome.”

Banjoko sought solace in hip hop music as a youth; it functioned as an outlet and sanctuary. Not only did the lyrics lend meaning to a racially-charged time, but he noticed a reoccurring mention of chess in these rappers’ lyrics, which drew him into the game as a form of meditation, along with martial arts. Seeing the self-healing trifecta, Banjoko now uses these tools as a basis for guiding students’ on a path toward self-discovery.

READ MORE: http://www.examiner.com/article/a-game-changer-the-move-toward-empowering-bay-area-youth?cid=rss

adisa banjoka hip hop chess federation James Peterson

'HIP-HOP ON TRIAL: HIP-HOP DOESN'T ENHANCE SOCIETY, IT DEGRADES IT'

Jesse Jackson, KRS-One, Q-Tip, Estelle, ?uestlove, P. J. O’Rourke, Jaron Lanier, and 14 other rappers, poets, academics and pundits came together in London on 26 June to debate the motion, ‘Hip-Hop on Trial: Hip-Hop Doesn’t Enhance Society, It Degrades it’, chaired by the BBC’s Emily Maitlis, and moderated online by Jemima Khan. 

Presented by Intelligence Squared and Google+, it was the third in their new joint debate series, Versus. The first ever global debate on hip-hop saw fierce arguments put forward by speakers who were live on stage, and also beamed into the event via Google+ Hangouts, a live multi-person platform.

tricia rose krs1 Michael Eric Dyson dream hampton q-tip James Peterson ?uestlove jesse jackson estelle

SHAKE UP YOUR LIBRARY: USING HIP HOP AND RAP TO ATTRACT TEENS AND NEW ADULTS



A Symposium for Youth Services Librarians – Friday, June 1, 2012, 8 am – 5 pm - $20


This all-day event sponsored by the New Jersey State Library for youth services librarians and other library staff, or staff in schools and afterschool organizations who work with teens and new adults, or millennials, will provide an overview of hip hop and rap music culture and its appeal to young people by experts in the field and will be held on Friday, June 1, 2012, at Rutgers-Newark, in the Paul Robeson Campus Center. The goal of the program is to encourage youth services librarians to incorporate this type of popular music into their library collections and programs so that the libraries’ will truly reflect the interests of the young people they serve. 


This symposium will feature Keynote Speaker Chuck D, leader and co-founder of the legendary rap group Public Enemy; Dr. James Petersen, Director of Africana Studies and Associate Professor of English at Lehigh University; Martha Diaz,  Founding Director, Hip-Hop Education Center; Dr. Akil Khalfani, Director of the Africana Institute and Associate Professor of Sociology at Essex County College; Prof. Bernard Kaplan, Associate Professor at the University of Delaware in Fiction Writing, Contemporary Literature, Novel, Short Story, Literature and Opera who also teaches Hip-Hop Culture; and Marvin DeBose, Adult/Young Adult Librarian at the Overbrook Park Branch of the Philadelphia Free Library.

TO REGISTER GO TO: http://hiphop4yalibrarians.eventbrite.com

SHAKE UP YOUR LIBRARY: USING HIP HOP AND RAP TO ATTRACT TEENS AND NEW ADULTS

A Symposium for Youth Services Librarians – Friday, June 1, 2012, 8 am – 5 pm - $20

This all-day event sponsored by the New Jersey State Library for youth services librarians and other library staff, or staff in schools and afterschool organizations who work with teens and new adults, or millennials, will provide an overview of hip hop and rap music culture and its appeal to young people by experts in the field and will be held on Friday, June 1, 2012, at Rutgers-Newark, in the Paul Robeson Campus Center. The goal of the program is to encourage youth services librarians to incorporate this type of popular music into their library collections and programs so that the libraries’ will truly reflect the interests of the young people they serve.

This symposium will feature Keynote Speaker Chuck D, leader and co-founder of the legendary rap group Public Enemy; Dr. James Petersen, Director of Africana Studies and Associate Professor of English at Lehigh University; Martha Diaz,  Founding Director, Hip-Hop Education Center; Dr. Akil Khalfani, Director of the Africana Institute and Associate Professor of Sociology at Essex County College; Prof. Bernard Kaplan, Associate Professor at the University of Delaware in Fiction Writing, Contemporary Literature, Novel, Short Story, Literature and Opera who also teaches Hip-Hop Culture; and Marvin DeBose, Adult/Young Adult Librarian at the Overbrook Park Branch of the Philadelphia Free Library.

TO REGISTER GO TO: http://hiphop4yalibrarians.eventbrite.com

Chuck D martha diaz james peterson akil khalfani bernard kaplan marvin deBose